Dive #12 - Rich Torkington's Dive Log
Copyright 2010 Rich Torkington Mesa, Arizona

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Bottom Time to Date:

7h
50m


Dive Info:

Dive Start:
8:00PM

Bottom Time:
29 minutes

Maximum Depth:
26 feet

Safety Stop:
Long time in shallows

Beginning Air:
3000 psi

Ending Air:
2600 psi

Weather Conditions:
80F

Surface Conditions:
Calm

Surface Water Temperature:
81F

Bottom Water Temperature:
81F

Visibility:
60 feet
12
TITLE
* *
July 3,
1998
BABY DOCK (CAPTAIN DON'S HABITAT)
BONAIRE
NIGHT SHORE DIVE
 
Linda, Mercedes, and Myron (buddies)
Captain Don's Habitat
http://www.habitatbonaire.com/
Rich
Spotted spiny lobster in the jetty rocks
Photo by Myron Johnson in Bonaire 1998 
Dive Journal: After dinner, we are all ready for another dive. Linda and I are a bit apprehensive at the prospect of doing a night dive, since it will be our first. We suit up and jump off Baby Dock about 8:00PM, equipped with primary and backup dive lights. Linda has opted to wear a hood along with her shorty and Lycra, and has donned an additional 2 lbs of weight to compensate for the extra buoyancy of the hood.

Captain Don's has thoughtfully provided a rope guideline anchored on one end of Baby Dock, with the other end tied to a large concrete block at the reef's edge. This rope is very helpful for navigation for us novices, and especially so at night. We follow this rope slowly out over the sand flats, perhaps a 50 yard swim. There is plenty of light penetrating the water from the restaurant and dock lights, and so we use our dive lights sparingly.

Once over the reef edge, we begin our descent, but Linda has immediate trouble clearing her ears. After repeated unsuccessful attempts, we decide to stay shallow on this dive and explore the sand flats. No worry - there is plenty to see. The most striking creatures are enormous 6-7 foot silvery fishes we see lurking in the outskirts of our dive lights, later identified as both tarpon and snook. These patrolling night feeders use divers' lights to see and snag small fish meals in a lightening display of speed. We also observe a very colorful spotted spiny lobster hiding out in the jetty wall off the restaurant, and Myron takes some time to get a good photograph of him. There are some beautiful orange cup corals growing on the Baby Dock pilings as well.

We make it a short dive since Linda's ears are uncomfortable, and exit after only 29 minutes. It's just as well, for I am truly exhausted, and I am also trying to nurse a threatening ingrown toenail. Mercedes indicates that nitrogen absorption, dehydration, and an excess of sun can make you very tired, and that plenty of rest and water is the remedy. Still, we are both exhilarated by our first day of Bonaire diving and we're looking forward to tomorrow.

More
Dive
Info:
Fins:
Mares Avanti Quattro
Computer:
U S Divers Matrix
Tank:
80 ft3 Al
BCD:
SeaQuest Spectrum 4
Dive Type:
SHORE NIGHT
Body of Water:
Caribbean
Mask:
U S Divers
Protection:
3mm shorty
Regulator:
SeaQuest
Spectrum XR2
plus Oceanic
Slimline octopus
Weight:
8 lb
Water Type:
Salt
Video Equipment:
None